Discussion:
TOT: Internet broadband without mains power
(too old to reply)
madge
2014-01-05 16:47:42 UTC
Permalink
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or demand/live
channels during power cuts.

We had a 24 hr power cut on the 23rd/24th Dec and more short power losses
post Christmas day. I went to the sales and bought at a reasonable price
an Asus Transformer with Windows 8.1 that has a 10hr battery capability.
It works wonderfully with my BT hubs WiFi. I also run my main desktop
using a lan cable into the BT hub as well. But not when there is no power
to the hub obviously.

DING!! "I'll attach one of my old BT Voyager 105 USB broadband modems,
which are powered by the USB/PC cable, to the brand new ASUS USB3 port"
and still get good old broadband. Drivers loaded OK, the modem power light
came on and then it went through the usual linking to landline. Both
lights stayed on. YIPPEE!! ... BUGGER!! both lights then went out after 5
seconds. DONG!!

Did a check and BT Website states specifically that you cannot use that
modem with Windows Vista/7/8.

As an aside I have an old Toshiba Laptop still running Windows XP which
does power the BT105 modem and I can use my broadband. However even if I
have it fully charged I probably only get about 45 minutes of watching
video off the net.

I was hoping to get some decent viewing time using the new ASUS. Has
anyone had any success/experience with the newer versions of Windows using
a USB Modem that is powered by the PC cable.

TIA
--
A really crap coded website https://sites.google.com/site/themadge/
This information is provided without warranty of any kind
Clem Dye
2014-01-05 17:41:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
We had a 24 hr power cut on the 23rd/24th Dec and more short power
losses post Christmas day. I went to the sales and bought at a
reasonable price an Asus Transformer with Windows 8.1 that has a 10hr
battery capability. It works wonderfully with my BT hubs WiFi. I also
run my main desktop using a lan cable into the BT hub as well. But not
when there is no power to the hub obviously.
DING!! "I'll attach one of my old BT Voyager 105 USB broadband modems,
which are powered by the USB/PC cable, to the brand new ASUS USB3 port"
and still get good old broadband. Drivers loaded OK, the modem power
light came on and then it went through the usual linking to landline.
Both lights stayed on. YIPPEE!! ... BUGGER!! both lights then went out
after 5 seconds. DONG!!
Did a check and BT Website states specifically that you cannot use that
modem with Windows Vista/7/8.
As an aside I have an old Toshiba Laptop still running Windows XP which
does power the BT105 modem and I can use my broadband. However even if I
have it fully charged I probably only get about 45 minutes of watching
video off the net.
I was hoping to get some decent viewing time using the new ASUS. Has
anyone had any success/experience with the newer versions of Windows
using a USB Modem that is powered by the PC cable.
TIA
Rather than go through all this pain it might be easier to buy one of
those 3 wi-fi/3g dongles as a back-up. I have just this thing for use in
power cuts or when your broadband goes down.

Clem
Andy Burns
2014-01-05 17:56:10 UTC
Permalink
it might be easier to buy one of those 3 wi-fi/3g dongles as a
back-up. I have just this thing for use in power cuts or when your
broadband goes down.
The old Vodafone dongle with non-expiring credit was very handy as a
standby, but they've recently killed them all off, they now have 30 day
expiry like all the rest, the next time the scrotes nick BT's cable I'll
just tether to my mobile.
madge
2014-01-05 19:02:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 17:56:10 -0000, Andy Burns
Post by Andy Burns
it might be easier to buy one of those 3 wi-fi/3g dongles as a
back-up. I have just this thing for use in power cuts or when your
broadband goes down.
The old Vodafone dongle with non-expiring credit was very handy as a
standby, but they've recently killed them all off, they now have 30 day
expiry like all the rest, the next time the scrotes nick BT's cable I'll
just tether to my mobile.
Thank you gentlemen but watching video across 3g/4g out here in the wilds
of Kent where I'm lucky to get Edge or HSDPA would be a nice but
unrealistic. I got 3G once on my Kindle here and only one bar out of the
four bar indicator.

The telephone exchange is 200 metres away and I do pay for the service. On
a bad day I get 5.6Mb line speed.
--
My Kindle/Mobile links page | All Kindles | http://goo.gl/ySe0d
Use these for low bandwidth | All Mobiles | http://KindLink.tk/
A really crap coded website | All Devices |
https://sites.google.com/site/themadge/
This information is provided without warranty of any kind
Michael Chare
2014-01-06 00:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 17:56:10 -0000, Andy Burns
Post by Andy Burns
it might be easier to buy one of those 3 wi-fi/3g dongles as a
back-up. I have just this thing for use in power cuts or when your
broadband goes down.
The old Vodafone dongle with non-expiring credit was very handy as a
standby, but they've recently killed them all off, they now have 30
day expiry like all the rest, the next time the scrotes nick BT's
cable I'll just tether to my mobile.
Thank you gentlemen but watching video across 3g/4g out here in the
wilds of Kent where I'm lucky to get Edge or HSDPA would be a nice but
unrealistic. I got 3G once on my Kindle here and only one bar out of the
four bar indicator.
If you were really in the wilds of Kent you would not get much video via
a metal landline. I am just waiting for my glass connection.
--
Michael Chare
NY
2014-01-05 20:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clem Dye
Rather than go through all this pain it might be easier to buy one of
those 3 wi-fi/3g dongles as a back-up. I have just this thing for use in
power cuts or when your broadband goes down.
That depends crucially on two things:

- Will there still be power to the nearest 3G mast? (same problem as getting
power to the nearest exchange)

- Is there a usable 3G (or even 2G) signal? Rural areas which are more prone
to power cuts (great generalisation, I know!) are the sort of places where
mobile internet (even 2G, never mind luxuries like 3G or 4G) is very patchy:
in my experience, living in North Yorkshire between York and Scarborough,
and close to the main A64 road, mobile internet is VERY poor: at best,
slower than dial-up; at worst, non-existent. Only in big cities like Leeds
is there 4G, and even in York where there's supposedly 3G, it's very patchy
and pathetic speed even for simply web page browsing.
Mark Carver
2014-01-06 17:40:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by NY
Only in big cities like
Leeds is there 4G, and even in York where there's supposedly 3G, it's
very patchy and pathetic speed even for simply web page browsing.
Depends on the network, even small towns like Colchester and Basingstoke
now have 4G from EE, and 3G is far more widespread in the sticks than from
Vodafone.

EE 3/4G is good enough on motorways, A roads, and in towns, round here
(Hants/Berks/Surrey) to make i-player listening using the phone in my pocket,
bluetooth linked to the car audio system, perfectly useable. (One of two one
second glitches per hour)
--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
Colin Stamp
2014-01-05 19:03:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
How sure are you that the broadband will continue to work during a power
cut? Would they bother with a backup supply for that kind of stuff at
the local exchange?

Cheers,

Colin.
Mark Carver
2014-01-05 19:20:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Stamp
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
How sure are you that the broadband will continue to work during a power
cut? Would they bother with a backup supply for that kind of stuff at
the local exchange?
Indeed, and if it's only 200 metres away, you're probably going to
be on the same circuit as it !
--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
madge
2014-01-05 19:34:38 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 19:20:47 -0000, Mark Carver
Post by Mark Carver
Post by Colin Stamp
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
How sure are you that the broadband will continue to work during a power
cut? Would they bother with a backup supply for that kind of stuff at
the local exchange?
Indeed, and if it's only 200 metres away, you're probably going to
be on the same circuit as it !
When I were a lad I worked for BT for 31 years (Post Office Telegram
Service when I started). Battery backup at the exchanges were to run a
minimum of 50 hours.

Also our landline phone service was working during the power outages. How
else could I enjoy being on hold with EDF for 3 hours waiting for them to
find a customer care assistant to answer my query?
--
https://sites.google.com/site/themadge/
This information is provided without warranty of any kind
Mark Carver
2014-01-05 19:42:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
Post by Mark Carver
Indeed, and if it's only 200 metres away, you're probably going to
be on the same circuit as it !
When I were a lad I worked for BT for 31 years (Post Office Telegram
Service when I started). Battery backup at the exchanges were to run a
minimum of 50 hours.
Also our landline phone service was working during the power outages.
How else could I enjoy being on hold with EDF for 3 hours waiting for
them to find a customer care assistant to answer my query?
Yes the *phone* service will work, but the *DSLAMS* are mains powered, there
might well be UPS support to cope with 'brown outs', but I doubt there's more
than 5 to 10 mins worth of battery provision for them ? What would be the
point for domestic grade broadband service.
--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
madge
2014-01-05 22:00:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 19:42:16 -0000, Mark Carver
Post by Mark Carver
Post by madge
Post by Mark Carver
Indeed, and if it's only 200 metres away, you're probably going to
be on the same circuit as it !
When I were a lad I worked for BT for 31 years (Post Office Telegram
Service when I started). Battery backup at the exchanges were to run a
minimum of 50 hours.
Also our landline phone service was working during the power outages.
How else could I enjoy being on hold with EDF for 3 hours waiting for
them to find a customer care assistant to answer my query?
Yes the *phone* service will work, but the *DSLAMS* are mains powered,
there might well be UPS support to cope with 'brown outs', but I doubt
there's more than 5 to 10 mins worth of battery provision for them ?
What would be the point for domestic grade broadband service.
...and of course BT has shut down it's dial-up-service now.
--
My Kindle/Mobile links page | All Kindles | http://goo.gl/ySe0d
Use these for low bandwidth | All Mobiles | http://KindLink.tk/
A really crap coded website | All Devices |
https://sites.google.com/site/themadge/
This information is provided without warranty of any kind
tedjrr
2014-01-05 22:48:11 UTC
Permalink
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered, then the best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your router. Many domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a relative period of power if the router s the only load. The alternative is to use a car battery to power an inverter.
Max Demian
2014-01-05 23:05:21 UTC
Permalink
"tedjrr" <***@tedjrr.co.uk> wrote in message news:a7aa15e6-0e5e-4577-ae4d-***@googlegroups.com...
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered, then the
best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your router. Many
domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a relative period of power
if the router s the only load. The alternative is to use a car battery to
power an inverter.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

My modem/router is powered by 12V via a wall wart so I assume 8 rechargeable
AA batteries in a Maplin battery box with a suitable connecter would power
it for about an hour. £25 or so the lot including chargers.

Fortunately power cuts are rare here.
--
Max Demian
Roderick Stewart
2014-01-06 11:01:22 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Jan 2014 23:05:21 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
My modem/router is powered by 12V via a wall wart so I assume 8 rechargeable
AA batteries in a Maplin battery box with a suitable connecter would power
it for about an hour. £25 or so the lot including chargers.
I have experimented with precisely this arrangement, just to prove to
myself that it is possible. I used ordinary disposable alkaline cells
and they worked just fine. As I've never had a power cut in all the
time I've lived in my present house, about 21 years, it seems such a
small risk that it isn't worth investing much to cover it. A Maplin
battery holder and a cable seems plenty, if not actually overkill, as
I will probably never need it at all.

Rod.
Ian Jackson
2014-01-05 23:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by tedjrr
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered,
then the best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your
router. Many domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a
relative period of power if the router s the only load. The
alternative is to use a car battery to power an inverter.
My router runs off a 12V, 1A wall wart PSU - and I expect many also do.
If so, then skip the inverter.
--
Ian
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2014-01-06 16:27:52 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Jan 2014 23:15:14 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by tedjrr
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered,
then the best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your
router. Many domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a
relative period of power if the router s the only load. The
alternative is to use a car battery to power an inverter.
My router runs off a 12V, 1A wall wart PSU - and I expect many also do.
If so, then skip the inverter.
For many just running a lead in from the car parked outside plugged
into the 12v cigar lighter socket would be an option. With a simple
plug it not be a good idea to run the engine unless you know your
12volt equipment will take the higher charging voltage but stablised
power supplies to let you do this are easily available.

G.Harman
Ian Jackson
2014-01-06 19:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sun, 5 Jan 2014 23:15:14 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by tedjrr
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered,
then the best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your
router. Many domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a
relative period of power if the router s the only load. The
alternative is to use a car battery to power an inverter.
My router runs off a 12V, 1A wall wart PSU - and I expect many also do.
If so, then skip the inverter.
For many just running a lead in from the car parked outside plugged
into the 12v cigar lighter socket would be an option. With a simple
plug it not be a good idea to run the engine unless you know your
12volt equipment will take the higher charging voltage but stablised
power supplies to let you do this are easily available.
I doubt if the wall wart PSU for my Linksys router is stabilised. The
label simply says 12V, 1000mA. It isn't switchmode, and has a chunky
transformer. I wouldn't be surprised if the rest of the circuit is
simply a fullwave bridge and a reservoir capacitor. I expect that I
could run the router off a small floating 12V (13.4V) battery which is
being constantly trickle-charged at a rate sufficient to ensure it IS
actually slightly charging, and not being flattened by the router.
--
Ian
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 22:49:46 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Jan 2014 19:39:51 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sun, 5 Jan 2014 23:15:14 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by tedjrr
Assuming that the local exchange or cabinet DSLAM is still powered,
then the best approach would be to use axillary power to maintain your
router. Many domestic UPS units are low cost, and will provide a
relative period of power if the router s the only load. The
alternative is to use a car battery to power an inverter.
My router runs off a 12V, 1A wall wart PSU - and I expect many also do.
If so, then skip the inverter.
For many just running a lead in from the car parked outside plugged
into the 12v cigar lighter socket would be an option. With a simple
plug it not be a good idea to run the engine unless you know your
12volt equipment will take the higher charging voltage but stablised
power supplies to let you do this are easily available.
I doubt if the wall wart PSU for my Linksys router is stabilised. The
label simply says 12V, 1000mA. It isn't switchmode, and has a chunky
transformer. I wouldn't be surprised if the rest of the circuit is
simply a fullwave bridge and a reservoir capacitor. I expect that I
could run the router off a small floating 12V (13.4V) battery which is
being constantly trickle-charged at a rate sufficient to ensure it IS
actually slightly charging, and not being flattened by the router.
Such kit (routers, ethernet swicthes and the like) have been using
switching regulators on the DC input jacks for better than a decade
now. Long gone are the analogue regulators of yesteryear.

It's only recently that the classic mains transformer based wallwarts
used to provide unregulated DC (or even simply the low voltage AC
transformer output voltage to feed the bridge rectifier integrated
into the swicting regulator in some kit - allowing such kit to also
use unregulated DC as well as a nominal 6 to 12v AC) have started to
be usurped by the more efficient and lighter SMPSU type.

A switch or router or ADSL/Cable modem router can usually be safely
powered direct from a 12v lead acid battery because of the use of
switching regulator technology.

Even a car battery being float charged by a running engine will be
well below the limiting maximum input voltage rating of the input
capacitor (16 or 25v being typical). However, I'd be a little bit
leary of testing at voltages higher than 15 volt, even when a 25v
capacitor is used on an input labelled simply to match that of the
nominal output voltage of the supplied wallwart.

It's quite easy to verify whether a switching regulator is being used
by measuring current consumption from a DC test supply initially set
to match the labelled input voltage and observe whether the current
increases as you lower the supply voltage (and vice versa as you
increase it).

If it draws more current on a lower voltage, it's the expected
switching regulator otherwise if it shows an almost constant current
draw with a very slight positive slope, it'll be an antiquated
analogue regulator.

You might be surprised that the move from a cheap 'n'cheerful
analogue regulator solution to the, at the time, more expensive
switching technology solution was driven by economical considerations.

The big problem was that analogue regulators were likely to dissipate
as much energy as they were supplying to the 'load' (in some cases,
more) which necessitated a decent sized heatsink.

The usual solution was to use the metal case itself as a heatsink.
Unfortunately, metal cases only made sense in the days before mass
market demands transformed this kit into 'cheap commodity' consumer
items where the need to eliminate the expense of a metal case became a
serious consideration.

The manufacturers could make considerable cost savings if they could
eliminate the waste energy (heat) issue of the analogue voltage
regultor since they could then make the case out of cheap plastic
injection mouldings. Not only that, cheaper wallwarts with only 60% or
so of the VA ratings of the earlier analogue regulated kit would
provide even further savings (and had the added bonus of "being a
greener product"). It was a "Win win" situation all round for
everyone.

Not every bit of kit is "Car Battery Safe" but such examples are few
and far between. A big clue to this 'danger' is if the input voltage
is marked as 6 or 7.5 volt. Most kit with a 10 to 15v input rating
should be perfectly ok with car battery power. Even the kit marked
with 6 or 7.5 volt ratings might be just as fine (just as long as the
input capacitor voltage rating isn't marked as 10v or less).
--
Regards, J B Good
Jeff Layman
2014-01-06 08:16:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Carver
Post by madge
Post by Mark Carver
Indeed, and if it's only 200 metres away, you're probably going to
be on the same circuit as it !
When I were a lad I worked for BT for 31 years (Post Office Telegram
Service when I started). Battery backup at the exchanges were to run a
minimum of 50 hours.
Also our landline phone service was working during the power outages.
How else could I enjoy being on hold with EDF for 3 hours waiting for
them to find a customer care assistant to answer my query?
Yes the *phone* service will work, but the *DSLAMS* are mains powered, there
might well be UPS support to cope with 'brown outs', but I doubt there's more
than 5 to 10 mins worth of battery provision for them ? What would be the
point for domestic grade broadband service.
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries. (I was also
surprised that it wasn't nicked, as it was left outside the cab for
several days before they installed it!)

So what would the capacity of that battery have been? Probably at least
2kWh. Surely that would have been enough to run the cab for several
hours. So those using BT's FTTC service could probably expect to use
broadband in a power cut if they could power their modems at home.
--
Jeff
Mark Carver
2014-01-06 09:22:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries. (I was also
surprised that it wasn't nicked, as it was left outside the cab for
several days before they installed it!)
So what would the capacity of that battery have been? Probably at least
2kWh. Surely that would have been enough to run the cab for several
hours. So those using BT's FTTC service could probably expect to use
broadband in a power cut if they could power their modems at home.
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.

UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
Bill Wright
2014-01-06 11:08:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Post by Mark Carver
UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
Doesn't it depend largely on ambient temperature and correct float
charging? I would have thought a battery that was very rarely discharged
ought to last a fair time. How often do they change alarm batteries?

Bill
David Taylor
2014-01-06 11:20:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
--
David Taylor
Bill Wright
2014-01-06 11:47:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen? And if it did, wouldn't modern PSUs carry
on regardless, down to about 100VAC?

Bill
charles
2014-01-06 12:14:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are
for brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of
time, it would be pointless because most likely the majority of the
served subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen? And if it did, wouldn't modern PSUs carry
on regardless, down to about 100VAC?
we used to get brown outs, particularly at night. In the morning my roter
had locked up and required to be turned off an on again. Since fitting a
ups this has never happened, although we still get brownouts as shown by
other pieces of kit.
--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
Paul Ratcliffe
2014-01-06 12:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen?
Yes it does happen. And reasonably regularly according to the monitoring
I have on my UPS.
Post by Bill Wright
And if it did, wouldn't modern PSUs carry on regardless, down to about 100VAC?
Some things cope better than others.
Bill Wright
2014-01-06 14:19:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen?
Yes it does happen. And reasonably regularly according to the monitoring
I have on my UPS.
Interesting. Down to what voltage?

Bill
Paul Ratcliffe
2014-01-06 17:17:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen?
Yes it does happen. And reasonably regularly according to the monitoring
I have on my UPS.
Interesting. Down to what voltage?
It varies, as you might expect. Typically 150-170V. Sometimes down to 130V.
Occasionally lower and I think I've had one instance of about 70V.

Then there were the 0.25s breaks we used to get, but that was fixed when the
cable eventually went bang properly and Western Power took out a load of my
(unwanted) thorny hedge for me and then paid me for the privilege :-)
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 22:51:19 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 17:17:51 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen?
Yes it does happen. And reasonably regularly according to the monitoring
I have on my UPS.
Interesting. Down to what voltage?
It varies, as you might expect. Typically 150-170V. Sometimes down to 130V.
Occasionally lower and I think I've had one instance of about 70V.
Then there were the 0.25s breaks we used to get, but that was fixed when the
cable eventually went bang properly and Western Power took out a load of my
(unwanted) thorny hedge for me and then paid me for the privilege :-)
Or even for the 'Privet' :-)
--
Regards, J B Good
Paul Ratcliffe
2014-01-15 21:35:30 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 17:17:51 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Paul Ratcliffe
Post by Bill Wright
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
Yes but does it ever happen?
Yes it does happen. And reasonably regularly according to the monitoring
I have on my UPS.
Interesting. Down to what voltage?
It varies, as you might expect. Typically 150-170V. Sometimes down to 130V.
Occasionally lower and I think I've had one instance of about 70V.
Two examples today. One at 15:52 down to 82V and another (unknown voltage)
at 17:37.

Roderick Stewart
2014-01-06 21:25:57 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Jan 2014 11:20:01 +0000 (UTC), David Taylor
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
I always thought the derivation of "brown out" was any kind of problem
serious enough to provoke an ablutionary mishap of the second kind, or
an evocation to that effect, e.g. "Oh shit!". I never realised it had
an actual technical meaning with a definition, like proper words
n'stuff, like in the dictionary. I mean, I've never seen it in a book.

Rod.
Peter Duncanson
2014-01-06 22:38:54 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 21:25:57 +0000, Roderick Stewart
Post by Roderick Stewart
On Mon, 6 Jan 2014 11:20:01 +0000 (UTC), David Taylor
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
I always thought the derivation of "brown out" was any kind of problem
serious enough to provoke an ablutionary mishap of the second kind, or
an evocation to that effect, e.g. "Oh shit!". I never realised it had
an actual technical meaning with a definition, like proper words
n'stuff, like in the dictionary. I mean, I've never seen it in a book.
Rod.
A "blackout" is the result of a total loss of power, so "brownout" was
used to mean something in between full power and no power.

Thw word was apparently invented in the US in the 1940s.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/brownout
--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2014-01-06 23:08:18 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 22:38:54 +0000, Peter Duncanson
Post by Peter Duncanson
Post by Roderick Stewart
I always thought the derivation of "brown out" was any kind of problem
serious enough to provoke an ablutionary mishap of the second kind, or
an evocation to that effect, e.g. "Oh shit!". I never realised it had
an actual technical meaning with a definition, like proper words
n'stuff, like in the dictionary. I mean, I've never seen it in a book.
Rod.
A "blackout" is the result of a total loss of power, so "brownout" was
used to mean something in between full power and no power.
Thw word was apparently invented in the US in the 1940s.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/brownout
I've never really thought that much about it but just assumed the term
was derived from the appearance of incandescent lamps running on
reduced voltage.

G.Harman
Bill Wright
2014-01-07 09:26:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
I've never really thought that much about it but just assumed the term
was derived from the appearance of incandescent lamps running on
reduced voltage.
Just as 'blackout' was derived from incandescent lamps running on no volts.

Bill
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 23:37:32 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 21:25:57 +0000, Roderick Stewart
Post by Roderick Stewart
On Mon, 6 Jan 2014 11:20:01 +0000 (UTC), David Taylor
Post by David Taylor
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Then it appears you do understand.
I always thought the derivation of "brown out" was any kind of problem
serious enough to provoke an ablutionary mishap of the second kind, or
an evocation to that effect, e.g. "Oh shit!". I never realised it had
an actual technical meaning with a definition, like proper words
n'stuff, like in the dictionary. I mean, I've never seen it in a book.
It's been a common term in the power industry worldwide ever since
the first power grid networks were constructed (quite probably even
pre-dating that period when the primary use of local DC generating
plant was to power electric lighting).

Here's a quote from a wiki article:

"The term brownout comes from the dimming experienced by lighting when
the voltage sags."

Quite obviously, in the context of electric lighting, a "Blackout" is
exactly the result you get when the power supply fails completely.

I guess 'Brownout' seemed a more appropriate description than say
"Greyout" when using colour based metaphors.

Brownouts can be just as harmful as surge events, which can damage
winding insulation in motors.

A brownout can cause excessive currents to flow in motors as they try
to maintain torque to their mechanical loads on the reduced supply
voltage.

In some cases the resulting stall, if it doesn't trip the circuit
breaker(s) can result in the motor literally burning out.
--
Regards, J B Good
Roderick Stewart
2014-01-07 00:16:16 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 23:37:32 +0000, Johny B Good
Post by Johny B Good
"The term brownout comes from the dimming experienced by lighting when
the voltage sags."
Quite obviously, in the context of electric lighting, a "Blackout" is
exactly the result you get when the power supply fails completely.
I guess 'Brownout' seemed a more appropriate description than say
"Greyout" when using colour based metaphors.
Well, I never knew it was that specific. If that's really the
derivation I agree "greyout" would be more appropriate, or perhaps
even "yellowout", because that's what happens to lamps when the
voltage is lowered.

Rod.
Bill Wright
2014-01-07 09:12:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roderick Stewart
I always thought the derivation of "brown out" was any kind of problem
serious enough to provoke an ablutionary mishap of the second kind, or
an evocation to that effect, e.g. "Oh shit!". I never realised it had
an actual technical meaning with a definition, like proper words
n'stuff, like in the dictionary. I mean, I've never seen it in a book.
That's the thing about this newsgroup. You learn so much. Incidentally
'brown up' is prison slang for dirty protest.

Bill
charles
2014-01-06 11:45:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Post by Mark Carver
UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
Doesn't it depend largely on ambient temperature and correct float
charging? I would have thought a battery that was very rarely discharged
ought to last a fair time. How often do they change alarm batteries?
5 years appears to be the accepted life.
--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
Bill Wright
2014-01-06 14:16:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Post by Mark Carver
UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
Doesn't it depend largely on ambient temperature and correct float
charging? I would have thought a battery that was very rarely discharged
ought to last a fair time. How often do they change alarm batteries?
5 years appears to be the accepted life.
I suppose it would depend on the acceptable degree of degradation.
People start their cars through the summer with almost totally shagged
batteries because the start takes about two seconds. Then winter comes...

Bill
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 17:50:50 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:45:18 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Post by Mark Carver
UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
Doesn't it depend largely on ambient temperature and correct float
charging? I would have thought a battery that was very rarely discharged
ought to last a fair time. How often do they change alarm batteries?
5 years appears to be the accepted life.
With UPSes, it's typically 3 to 5 years before they're completely
'shagged'. Five years for a 7AH 12v SLA at a replacement cost between
11 to 15 quid isn't too high a maintennce expense for a home alarm[1]
but a 3 year replacement of a pair (or more) of such batteries starts
to look rather ugly for a smallish UPS and gets uglier still with
larger UPSes (17AH x 4 12v SLAs for a 2KVA rated SmartUPS for
example).

[1] Even cheaper with a lot of the smaller Home Alarm systems since
they seem to be going away from the "Gold Standard" of 7AH 12v
'DryFits and using tiny 12 or 6 volt 3 or 4 AH batteries these days.
--
Regards, J B Good
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 17:39:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Mark Carver
I suspect those batteries, and all FTTC cabs seem to have them, are for
brown out protection, not to maintain service for any period of time, it
would be pointless because most likely the majority of the served
subscribers would be dead too.
Mark I don't understand. I thought 'brown out' was when the voltage was low.
Post by Mark Carver
UPS batteries need to be 'maintained' anyway, even in 'equipment room'
conditions their condition and performance will rapidly fall off
after a couple of years, that process would be accelerated inside
an outdoors roadside cabinet.
Doesn't it depend largely on ambient temperature and correct float
charging? I would have thought a battery that was very rarely discharged
ought to last a fair time. How often do they change alarm batteries?
The optimimum float charge voltage of 13.8v per 6 cell lead acid
battery will kill a car battery in little more than 6 to 12 months
(the "float charge" voltage from a car alternator is typically 14 to
14.2v).

I know this all seems counterintuitive but, believe me, I've "tested"
this on three occasions now. :-(

You'd think the absense of vibration and 150+ amp starter loads would
be a 'kindness' to a car battery but, ime, this has proved to be far
from the case. You can't get away with substituting an expensive UPS
battery string with a set (4 in my case) of "cheap 'n' ceerful" car
batteries (at least, not for any length of time).

The only alternative type to the usual SLA types used in UPSes that
might be just as good that I haven't (yet) tried are the "Deep
Discharge" Marine/Leisure batteries. It's not something I'd want to
try without finding a set (of 4) at a knockdown bargain price though.
--
Regards, J B Good
Steve Thackery
2014-01-06 18:00:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Johny B Good
The optimimum float charge voltage of 13.8v per 6 cell lead acid
battery will kill a car battery in little more than 6 to 12 months
(the "float charge" voltage from a car alternator is typically 14 to
14.2v).
I know this all seems counterintuitive but, believe me, I've "tested"
this on three occasions now. :-(
Yep. I've gotta mate who used to work in the battery industry and he
says car batteries are something of a special case. All the effort
goes into making good starting performance (hundreds of amps at very
low temperatures) for a very low cost, and far less effort is put into
parameters such as longevity or compatibility with non-vehicular
systems.
--
SteveT
Bill Wright
2014-01-06 19:09:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Johny B Good
The optimimum float charge voltage of 13.8v per 6 cell lead acid
battery will kill a car battery in little more than 6 to 12 months
That doesn't actually sound all that optimal. I'm not sure what you mean.

Bill
Johny B Good
2014-01-07 01:40:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Johny B Good
The optimimum float charge voltage of 13.8v per 6 cell lead acid
battery will kill a car battery in little more than 6 to 12 months
That doesn't actually sound all that optimal. I'm not sure what you mean.
Bill
All the UPSes I've owned over the years were set to float/trickle
charge at a voltage per cell of 2.3 (i.e. 13.8 for the single 12v 7AH
SLA (alarm battery of yesteryear) in the BackUPS500, 27.6 for the
Emmerson 450 and the SmartUPS 700 (a pair of 12v 7AH batteries) and
55.3 to 55.5 volts in the case of the SmartUPS 2000 with which I've
tried various 48 volt battery strings (4 x 36AH car batteries, twice!
various sets of 4 x 12v 7AH alarm batteries in parallel with 4 x 12v
25AH SLAs).

In all cases, as per the constant voltage chargers recommended in the
RS catalogue for the many and varies 12v SLA batteries they sell, it's
always been 13.8v per 12v SLA.

However, if you care to examine the wiki articles on the subject,
you'll find lower voltages being shown for the various lead acid cell
types:

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead-acid_battery>
--
Regards, J B Good
tony sayer
2014-01-08 20:57:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Johny B Good
Post by Bill Wright
Post by Johny B Good
The optimimum float charge voltage of 13.8v per 6 cell lead acid
battery will kill a car battery in little more than 6 to 12 months
That doesn't actually sound all that optimal. I'm not sure what you mean.
Bill
All the UPSes I've owned over the years were set to float/trickle
charge at a voltage per cell of 2.3 (i.e. 13.8 for the single 12v 7AH
SLA (alarm battery of yesteryear) in the BackUPS500, 27.6 for the
Emmerson 450 and the SmartUPS 700 (a pair of 12v 7AH batteries) and
55.3 to 55.5 volts in the case of the SmartUPS 2000 with which I've
tried various 48 volt battery strings (4 x 36AH car batteries, twice!
various sets of 4 x 12v 7AH alarm batteries in parallel with 4 x 12v
25AH SLAs).
In all cases, as per the constant voltage chargers recommended in the
RS catalogue for the many and varies 12v SLA batteries they sell, it's
always been 13.8v per 12v SLA.
We've been hanging the odd SLA battery across base station power
supplies for years at 13.8 volts and they've been fine. Much better that
a UPS which seem to be more bother then what there're worth on
unattended radio and comms sites especially when theres a sniff of
lightning in the air;!...
Post by Johny B Good
However, if you care to examine the wiki articles on the subject,
you'll find lower voltages being shown for the various lead acid cell
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead-acid_battery>
Of the APS power units we have around they still seem to cook the
batteries. One rack mount one was a pig to remove from the rack had to
take the machine just above it out to get the whole UPS out..
--
Tony Sayer
Roderick Stewart
2014-01-06 11:08:56 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 08:16:36 +0000, Jeff Layman
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries.
50V DC is standard for telephones, provided by a 24 cell lead/acid
battery at the exchange, so I'd guess the one you saw in the street
cabinet would be the same.

Rod.
Johny B Good
2014-01-06 17:53:51 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:08:56 +0000, Roderick Stewart
Post by Roderick Stewart
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 08:16:36 +0000, Jeff Layman
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries.
50V DC is standard for telephones, provided by a 24 cell lead/acid
battery at the exchange, so I'd guess the one you saw in the street
cabinet would be the same.
That must be a new standard. Exchange batteries, ime, have always
been a 'nominal' 52 volts made up of a couple of banks of 26 cells
each.
--
Regards, J B Good
Roderick Stewart
2014-01-06 21:32:39 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 17:53:51 +0000, Johny B Good
Post by Johny B Good
Post by Roderick Stewart
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries.
50V DC is standard for telephones, provided by a 24 cell lead/acid
battery at the exchange, so I'd guess the one you saw in the street
cabinet would be the same.
That must be a new standard. Exchange batteries, ime, have always
been a 'nominal' 52 volts made up of a couple of banks of 26 cells
each.
The only one I've seen was quite big. I guess I didn't count properly
and just assumed it was 24 cells, i.e. four car battery's worth, which
could be nominally 48 or 50 Volts depending on how you felt. I'm more
accustomed to things like TV studio relay panels and phantom powering,
which I've seen specified as either 48 or 50.

Rod.
Ian Jackson
2014-01-06 22:06:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roderick Stewart
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 17:53:51 +0000, Johny B Good
Post by Johny B Good
Post by Roderick Stewart
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries.
50V DC is standard for telephones, provided by a 24 cell lead/acid
battery at the exchange, so I'd guess the one you saw in the street
cabinet would be the same.
That must be a new standard. Exchange batteries, ime, have always
been a 'nominal' 52 volts made up of a couple of banks of 26 cells
each.
The only one I've seen was quite big. I guess I didn't count properly
and just assumed it was 24 cells, i.e. four car battery's worth, which
could be nominally 48 or 50 Volts depending on how you felt. I'm more
accustomed to things like TV studio relay panels and phantom powering,
which I've seen specified as either 48 or 50.
Surely four so-called 12V car batteries ARE around 52V?
--
Ian
Roderick Stewart
2014-01-07 00:20:46 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Jan 2014 22:06:49 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Roderick Stewart
Post by Johny B Good
Post by Roderick Stewart
Post by Jeff Layman
When an FTTC cabinet went in a few years ago where I used to live, I was
amazed to see a large battery (lead-acid?) go in as well. Looked like
it was physically the size of maybe 5 car batteries.
50V DC is standard for telephones, provided by a 24 cell lead/acid
battery at the exchange, so I'd guess the one you saw in the street
cabinet would be the same.
That must be a new standard. Exchange batteries, ime, have always
been a 'nominal' 52 volts made up of a couple of banks of 26 cells
each.
The only one I've seen was quite big. I guess I didn't count properly
and just assumed it was 24 cells, i.e. four car battery's worth, which
could be nominally 48 or 50 Volts depending on how you felt. I'm more
accustomed to things like TV studio relay panels and phantom powering,
which I've seen specified as either 48 or 50.
Surely four so-called 12V car batteries ARE around 52V?
On a good day. At the battery terminals. With no load.

Otherwise 4 x so-called 12V = so-called 48V.

Rod.
Bill Wright
2014-01-07 09:19:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Surely four so-called 12V car batteries ARE around 52V?
That depends on how you connect them together!

Bill
Colin Stamp
2014-01-05 19:51:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
When I were a lad I worked for BT for 31 years (Post Office Telegram
Service when I started). Battery backup at the exchanges were to run a
minimum of 50 hours.
Also our landline phone service was working during the power outages.
How else could I enjoy being on hold with EDF for 3 hours waiting for
them to find a customer care assistant to answer my query?
Phone is one thing - they're no-doubt obliged to back that up. Broadband
is another...

How long will the 50 hour phone system batteries last if they hang all
the broadband kit off them too? How much more would it cost to bring
them back up to 50 hours?

I wouldn't mind knowing one way or another myself actually.

Cheers,

Colin.
NY
2014-01-05 20:27:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Stamp
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
How sure are you that the broadband will continue to work during a power
cut? Would they bother with a backup supply for that kind of stuff at
the local exchange?
I'd not thought of that: I just assumed that broadband (like phone) would
continue. But it's a good point. The last time I had a power cut (which
lasted a couple of hours) the phone and broadband continued to work - I
fished a wired (ie not cordless) phone out of the cupboard and I used my
12V-to-240V inverter from my car to power the router to feed my laptop
(which fortunately was charged). The exchange is about a mile away and
according to the electricity company recorded message the outage affected a
large area, including the village where the exchange is. So how come they
were still providing phone and broadband several hours later - a very meaty
UPS or a generator?
Steve Thackery
2014-01-06 00:21:49 UTC
Permalink
So how come they were still providing phone and broadband several
hours later - a very meaty UPS or a generator?
Well, phone is easy enough: it's battery-backed and the bigger
exchanges have diesel generators.

Still waiting to hear from my mate in BT whether the batteries power
the DSLAMs as well.
--
SteveT
Roger Mills
2014-01-05 20:09:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or
demand/live channels during power cuts.
We had a 24 hr power cut on the 23rd/24th Dec and more short power
losses post Christmas day. I went to the sales and bought at a
reasonable price an Asus Transformer with Windows 8.1 that has a 10hr
battery capability. It works wonderfully with my BT hubs WiFi. I also
run my main desktop using a lan cable into the BT hub as well. But not
when there is no power to the hub obviously.
DING!! "I'll attach one of my old BT Voyager 105 USB broadband modems,
which are powered by the USB/PC cable, to the brand new ASUS USB3 port"
and still get good old broadband. Drivers loaded OK, the modem power
light came on and then it went through the usual linking to landline.
Both lights stayed on. YIPPEE!! ... BUGGER!! both lights then went out
after 5 seconds. DONG!!
Did a check and BT Website states specifically that you cannot use that
modem with Windows Vista/7/8.
As an aside I have an old Toshiba Laptop still running Windows XP which
does power the BT105 modem and I can use my broadband. However even if I
have it fully charged I probably only get about 45 minutes of watching
video off the net.
I was hoping to get some decent viewing time using the new ASUS. Has
anyone had any success/experience with the newer versions of Windows
using a USB Modem that is powered by the PC cable.
TIA
How is your BT hub powered? Does it have an wallwart which feeds 12v dc
into the hub itself?

If so, why not power it from a leisure battery - or somesuch - which
will keep it going for hours?!
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
Steve Thackery
2014-01-05 20:17:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Mills
If so, why not power it from a leisure battery - or somesuch - which
will keep it going for hours?!
I've written to a mate of mine in BT about whether the broadband kit in
the exchanges is battery-backed, and for how long.

I'll report back when he's answered.
--
SteveT
Steve Thackery
2014-01-06 16:14:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Mills
If so, why not power it from a leisure battery - or somesuch - which
will keep it going for hours?!
Right, here's the straight dope: exchange DSLAMS are fed from the
exchange 48V supply, so are covered by battery (and often generator)
backup in the same way as the PSTN equipment. That means it will work
for ages.

Cabinet DSLAMS also have battery backup. He isn't sure how long that
lasts, but it's not long - only a hour or two.
--
SteveT
madge
2014-01-06 17:29:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Thackery
Post by Roger Mills
If so, why not power it from a leisure battery - or somesuch - which
will keep it going for hours?!
Right, here's the straight dope: exchange DSLAMS are fed from the
exchange 48V supply, so are covered by battery (and often generator)
backup in the same way as the PSTN equipment. That means it will work
for ages.
Cabinet DSLAMS also have battery backup. He isn't sure how long that
lasts, but it's not long - only a hour or two.
Hoorah!

So to get back to my original question. Has anyone run a USB PC cable
powered ASDL modem NOT some sort of a Heath Robinson battery powered modem
under Windows VISTA/7/8 and if they have what modem was it?.

Also there is a difference in the 5v output from USB ports Version 1, 2 or
3? According to this
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_Power_Delivery_Specification#Power the
standard for USB port Version 3 as I have in the ASUS transformer keyboard
should allow for enough power for the modem.

Thanks Steve. I left BT in 2000 and all my contacts have retired as well.
--
My Kindle/Mobile links page | All Kindles | http://goo.gl/ySe0d
Use these for low bandwidth | All Mobiles | http://KindLink.tk/
A really crap coded website | All Devices |
https://sites.google.com/site/themadge/
This information is provided without warranty of any kind
Brian Gaff
2014-01-06 09:33:15 UTC
Permalink
I don't think you can still beat a fair sized car battery kept charged up
and invertors to supply the voltages you need from there really. I really
ought to get my finger out here, but I was also told that Virgins broadband
goes down if the power goes off at the green box that hums down the street,
so it would be rather academic!

Brian
--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Post by madge
Not too off topic really as I want to watch the BBC iPlayer or demand/live
channels during power cuts.
We had a 24 hr power cut on the 23rd/24th Dec and more short power losses
post Christmas day. I went to the sales and bought at a reasonable price
an Asus Transformer with Windows 8.1 that has a 10hr battery capability.
It works wonderfully with my BT hubs WiFi. I also run my main desktop
using a lan cable into the BT hub as well. But not when there is no power
to the hub obviously.
DING!! "I'll attach one of my old BT Voyager 105 USB broadband modems,
which are powered by the USB/PC cable, to the brand new ASUS USB3 port"
and still get good old broadband. Drivers loaded OK, the modem power light
came on and then it went through the usual linking to landline. Both
lights stayed on. YIPPEE!! ... BUGGER!! both lights then went out after 5
seconds. DONG!!
Did a check and BT Website states specifically that you cannot use that
modem with Windows Vista/7/8.
As an aside I have an old Toshiba Laptop still running Windows XP which
does power the BT105 modem and I can use my broadband. However even if I
have it fully charged I probably only get about 45 minutes of watching
video off the net.
I was hoping to get some decent viewing time using the new ASUS. Has
anyone had any success/experience with the newer versions of Windows using
a USB Modem that is powered by the PC cable.
TIA
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